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  • Mary McNabb commented on the file Two very proud fathers... April 26, 2017 - 8:41am
    Just found this post - congratulations! It's so much more fun being a grandparent - and your face shows that you'll enjoy it immensely. Such a great adventure.
  • Jesse Nesvold commented on the blog Affects of Multi Threading April 25, 2017 - 7:28pm
    Finally! Fixed the link problem. I'm still not overly impressed with the ability to either embed content or have a player on the page.
  • Interesting MSc funding opportunity: quite a nice bursary available for a qualified candidate, to assist with some important research. From the site (see link for further details)... Master studentships in modelling of microflow and biofilm...
  • Jon Dron bookmarked Learnium April 25, 2017 - 4:55pm
    Learnium is yet another attempt to overlay a cloud-based social medium on institutional learning, in the same family as systems like Edmodo, Wikispaces Classroom, Lore, GoingOn, etc, etc. I deliberately exclude from this list the far more excellent,...
    Comments
    • So @ Steve Swettenham - you're prompting several questions here.  Which two dimensions are you referring to in your response? And another question - could Net app'd learners be completely free of the digital appurtenances of the last century?

      Mary McNabb June 12, 2017 - 11:58am

    • @ Mary McNabb - 2D refers to the width and height screen interface that humans are currently using to view and navigate.

      An Australian researcher believes that she can create a quantum computer, which may qualify as a new form of computing; mix that with AI and robotics, and you have a recipe for homo sapien redundancy.  Hence, net app'd learners may be "freerer" of the digital accoutrements by developing actual survival skills (i.e., how to tell time, find your way, or understand weather patterns etc... when their Apple watch runs out of energy).

      Being tethered to an energy supply to access the digital world is tenuous compared to the ancient technology of rock paintings, clay tablets, and hemp scrolls; but being tethered to an app cloud (clouds come and go), is not independance for the enduser (rather a dependance that is reminiscent of an addiction).  As for your last question, would it not depend to some extent on the individual learners and societal interests? (i.e., a return to the Apple commercial of 1984).

      Steve Swettenham June 12, 2017 - 2:17pm

    • 2D like books and maps?

      Of course, our intelligence is and has long been tethered to and totally dependent on not only others around us but also the embedded knowledge of our forebears in the tools, products, and processes they create. It's not an optional extra - it is the nature of our engagement with the world and an inextricable  part of our very thinking. As we build more of that into the tools themselves there are huge potential gains - we get smarter and more powerful - and huge potential losses, including great risks of taking away our power to control the things that matter most to us. Power supplies and network dependence are very tangible frailties (and two that will hopefully be solved in the not too distant future), but we must inevitably become more and more dependent on others of our species too, sharing the cognitive load as well as the artefacts. That has been the essential thrust of the past few thousand years. I think part of the longer game is augmentation - at first, the clunky head-mounted or phone-based stuff but, later, a far more invisible and symbiotic relationship, in which we share in an enhanced and shared reality to which many contribute, and in which those 2D screens and separate information devices largely disappear from the physical space (though many will reappear virtually). Whether this turns us into the Borg (Mark Zuckerberg as the Borg Queen?) or whether we become a more connected, enlightened, caring species in the process hinges quite a bit on the decisions we make now. Interesting times!

      Jon Dron June 12, 2017 - 2:51pm

  • Laurie Milne published a blog post Comets, Climate Change, and Cultural Responses in the group AU Anthropology Interest Group April 24, 2017 - 11:23am
    A recent article by Martin B. Sweatman and Dimitrios Tsikritsis of the School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, which appears in Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry 17(1):233-250 offers support that meteor showers depicted on the...
  • Ilia Koulikov commented on the blog Reading from Server w/Telnet April 24, 2017 - 6:04am
    Hey Jesse, I just commented on your other post, before you could get the videos working. I'm glad you got them, though. Your first video is useful and I'll reference it in my own work for sure, when I get to using telnet because I'm also running...
  • Ilia Koulikov commented on the blog Affects of Multi Threading April 24, 2017 - 5:49am
  • Post processual archaeologies focus upon the cognitive or mental aspects of culture  and in the process practitioners study  past ways of thought often through the analysis of symbolic elements.  In their article, "Copyrighting the...
  • Samuel Peers created a wiki page Collaboration and Group Work April 22, 2017 - 8:35am
    Some of my group discussion and collaboration was centered around extra curricular topics I found interesting. Especially the following blog posts. This post I found interesting because it talks about a cheap Raspberry Pi with WiFi, something...
  • Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown published a blog post Listen to ancient language in the group AU Anthropology Interest Group April 21, 2017 - 8:10pm
    Hear what language spoken 6000 years ago might have souded like. http://www.openculture.com/2017/04/hear-what-the-language-spoken-by-our-ancestors-6000-years-ago-might-have-sounded-like.html
  • I enjoy this quote when the question of machine consciousness surfaces:   The question of whether machines can think is like the question of whether submarines can swim.   - Edsger Dijkstra      
  • Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown published a blog post The "Hobbit" - New information in the group AU Anthropology Interest Group April 21, 2017 - 2:13pm
    Study reveals Homo floresiensis not descended from Homo erectus http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/04/2017/study-reveals-homo-floresiensis-not-descended-from-homo-erectus
  • Good point, Abyra. We are still a long ways away from understanding conciousness, the issue described by the term 'hard problem of consciousness'[Wiki1] (I quite like the article Will we ever get our heads around...
  • Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown published a blog post Drone flight over Teotihuacan in the group AU Anthropology Interest Group April 20, 2017 - 3:00pm
    Enjoy the visuals from a drone flight over Teotihuacan -- an important urban centre in Mesoamerica dating from roughly 100 BC to around 550 AD. Contrary to popular belief, this is NOT an Aztec city. The Aztecs knew of the city and believed it to...
  • Sandra Law commented on the blog Literacy Levels Among College Students in the group Teaching and Learning at Athabasca April 20, 2017 - 11:05am
    I agree about requiring a course in discourse (or content) analysis. When I was working on my BA (English) in English, I took a stylistics course (which was taught by a linguist). I don't think that I have ever deconstructed the English language...
  • Mary Pringle commented on the blog Literacy Levels Among College Students in the group Teaching and Learning at Athabasca April 20, 2017 - 10:48am
    Years ago as a teaching assistant in composition, I did an experiment on reading comprehension by asking students to read and outline a specific article. It was not particularly difficult to understand although it presented information that would be...
  • Sandra Law published a blog post Literacy Levels Among College Students in the group Teaching and Learning at Athabasca April 20, 2017 - 10:39am
    Even though PSE students are adults they may struggle with reading for deep understanding.
    Comments
    • Years ago as a teaching assistant in composition, I did an experiment on reading comprehension by asking students to read and outline a specific article. It was not particularly difficult to understand although it presented information that would be new for them. My students generally did not pick up what were to me obvious structural indicators of main points. Instead, they focused on information that was familiar to them, especially if it had some emotional connection, and would identify that  as the main point of the article. So my conclusion is that higher-level reading skills (basically discourse analysis) need to be taught for many or maybe most postsecondary learners.

      Mary Pringle April 20, 2017 - 10:48am

    • I agree about requiring a course in discourse (or content) analysis. When I was working on my BA (English) in English, I took a stylistics course (which was taught by a linguist). I don't think that I have ever deconstructed the English language with such intensity as I did in that course. She had us counting the number of adverbial phrases, the number of negatives used in a single page of a novel (I choose Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury). Some students found it a very clinical approach, I thought it was fascinating.

      I remember an undergraduate anthropology (sort of a mix of sociobiology, ethology, and biological anthropology) course in which students were asked to analyse scientific articles on a particular subject (generally related to animal behaviour (sometimes human, primate)), not necessarily in the discipline of anthropology, e.g. kin selection in ground squirrels. It really taught me to read closely, carefully and critically. Because the articles (which the students chose, based on certain parameters) were not in the discipline I was studying and because we were limited to a single-spaced page in which to summarize and critique the article.

      Sandra Law April 20, 2017 - 11:05am

  • I don't feel that a robot could exceed the capacity of what a robot is until we have a complete understanding of our own biological systems. There are still so many things that we do not know about our own minds and how they function. It seems that...
  • Jesse Nesvold commented on the blog Affects of Multi Threading April 15, 2017 - 5:33pm