Landing : Athabascau University

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  • Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown published a blog post How to make an arrowhead in the group AU Anthropology Interest Group November 3, 2018 - 5:22pm
    The amazing Tim Rast explains and demonstrates the process for CBC https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/flintknapping-making-an-arrowhead-1.4873372?fbclid=IwAR2UhoseUInhDrDS9jSt_ATyRlD1t0XC6hIQdPIx-cqJVyMjvoyY9NS3mB4
  • Jon Dron commented on the file Beyond learning outcomes November 2, 2018 - 2:32pm
    Thanks Gerald! Yes, I had an 'aha' moment when I drew the Venn diagram and mapped it to intended outcomes. I've said as much in so many words many times before but, seeing it laid out in front of me, it just seemed so obvious that the only thing we...
  • Gerald Ardito commented on the file Beyond learning outcomes November 2, 2018 - 11:59am
    Jon, I really enjoyed reviewing the slide deck. If you have any audio, it would be great to be able to hear the presentation itself. I was unaware of Outcome Mapping or Outcome Harvesting, so I look forward to learning more about...
  • CIDER Session November 7, 2018 · 11am MTSocial affordances, social presence and sociable online learning environments: A study of the SIPS model in actionJoshua Weidlich, FernUniversität, Hagen
  • CIDER Session November 7, 2018 · 11am MTSocial affordances, social presence and sociable online learning environments: A study of the SIPS model in actionJoshua Weidlich, FernUniversität, Hagen
  • Mary McNabb commented on the file What we teach, what a student learns, what we assess November 1, 2018 - 8:59pm
    I agree about the Venn diagram, Jon, so I madea Doodly (my new toy) to record my very basic interpretation of what you were saying. I'd be interested in your thoughts. An Interpretation of teaching/learning/assessment posted by Jon Dron_31_10_18
  • Jon Dron commented on the file What we teach, what a student learns, what we assess November 1, 2018 - 9:27am
    Interesting point, Mary - I, of all people, should have thought about that! I was aiming the talk at teachers teaching in a conventional (well - as conventional as AU gets) context and so 'us and them' vocabulary seemed appropriate, but a more...
  • This is a huge oversimplification of the process Jon is describing. I think it puts human faces on the diagrams. It also lets me play with my new toy: Doodly.
  • Mary McNabb commented on the file What we teach, what a student learns, what we assess November 1, 2018 - 7:01am
    Thinking about how this diagram changes when the we is students (with some guidance from the teacher). Stay tuned for more on this :-)  
  • Jon Dron commented on the file What we teach, what a student learns, what we assess October 31, 2018 - 4:59pm
    I very sincerely hope not! See https://landing.athabascau.ca/file/view/3646763/beyond-learning-outcomes for the slides from which I took this graphic, and a brief explanation of them. The point of this is to illustrate how there's quite a big...
  • Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown published a blog post Tour of Alabama archaeological site in the group AU Anthropology Interest Group October 31, 2018 - 3:34pm
    To celebrate International Archaeology Day (Oct. 20th), AUs Stann Creek Regional Archaeology Project released a video walking tour of the monumental core of the ancient Maya site of Alabama, in the Stann Creek District of Central Belize. Watch the...
  • Timothy MacArthur commented on the file What we teach, what a student learns, what we assess October 31, 2018 - 3:32pm
    By this definition, do we define a "good" student by assessment only?
  • Jon Dron uploaded the file What we teach, what a student learns, what we assess October 31, 2018 - 2:57pm
    A Venn diagram of overlapping but distinct aspects of institutional teaching and learning
    Comments
    • Thinking about how this diagram changes when the we is students (with some guidance from the teacher). Stay tuned for more on this :-)

       

      Mary McNabb November 1, 2018 - 7:01am

    • Interesting point, Mary - I, of all people, should have thought about that! I was aiming the talk at teachers teaching in a conventional (well - as conventional as AU gets) context and so 'us and them' vocabulary seemed appropriate, but a more realistic systems diagram of all of this would reveal a very different picture. Even in this diagram, part of my point is exactly that teaching is always, and irreducibly, distributed. I don't think a more accurate rendition would be a Venn diagram any more, though.

      Jon Dron November 1, 2018 - 9:27am

    • I agree about the Venn diagram, Jon, so I madea Doodly (my new toy) to record my very basic interpretation of what you were saying. I'd be interested in your thoughts. An Interpretation of teaching/learning/assessment posted by Jon Dron_31_10_18

      Mary McNabb November 1, 2018 - 8:59pm

  • Jon Dron uploaded the file Beyond learning outcomes October 31, 2018 - 1:28pm
    This is a slide deck for a talk I'm giving today, at a faculty workshop, on the subject of learning outcomes. I think that well-considered learning outcomes can be really helpful when planning and designing learning activities, especially where...
    Comments
    • Jon,

      I really enjoyed reviewing the slide deck. If you have any audio, it would be great to be able to hear the presentation itself.

      I was unaware of Outcome Mapping or Outcome Harvesting, so I look forward to learning more about them.

      Particularly intriguing to me is how much tunnel vision gets added by not looking at all learning outcomes. So, thanks for that.

      Gerald Ardito November 2, 2018 - 11:59am

    • Thanks Gerald!

      Yes, I had an 'aha' moment when I drew the Venn diagram and mapped it to intended outcomes. I've said as much in so many words many times before but, seeing it laid out in front of me, it just seemed so obvious that the only thing we should ever assess is (in positive terms) what a student has learned. It's good news if that happens to overlap with what we are trying to teach and what we are trying to assess, but that's not the main point. Another nice thing about thinking this way is that, if a student achieves outcomes that we did not intend, but that happen to overlap with something else we assess (e.g. a different course) it can be used as evidence towards that, too. This does mean that we need to have a pretty fair idea of our intended outcomes across the whole institution (or at least a whole program), and thus will run into the many problems of misusing learning outcomes as currency/bureaucratic measurement tools, but it might be a way to sell the idea to those in charge.

      Alas, no audio or recording of any kind.

      I came across the concept of outcome mapping/harvesting at the International Federation of National Teaching Fellows conference earlier this year and it resonated with many of the things I have been grappling with over recent years. The details are fairly mundane and obvious - it's a project management tool for dealing with complex projects and emergent/unanticipated/fuzzy outcomes, but the general principle of identifying change (any change) as an outcome, and working back from that to discover what led to it makes an awful lot of sense to me in a learning context. The act of mapping itself is a highly reflective and potentially very effective pedagogical process in its own right, so it's a good idea even if bureaucracy prevents you from actually using those outcomes in summative assessment. If the powers that be prevent you from adding new outcomes (or from removing those that are pre-ordained) you can always add an outcome along the lines of 'be a reflective practitioner' or 'demonstrate the ability to be a lifelong learner' or 'critically evaluate their learning in the field' to the specified outcomes, but I think it is way more useful if we are allowed to be flexible in specifying criteria for success on a per-student basis.  

      Jon

      Jon Dron November 2, 2018 - 2:32pm

    • Jon,

      In a chunk of time full of synchronicity, I have been wondering about the same things. 

      I have been working with my teacher candidates in designing curriculum, specifically units of study and lesson plans for elementary school students. They are good students and very committed to being good teachers, but all of there work amounted to an addition problem = fact 1 + fact 2 + fact 3 = learning. You can imagine that the assessments they designed were very traditional and linear as well.

      I have been working with them pretty intensely around seeing that their job is to create learners and people in love iwth learning, not pushing content. I want to investigate outcome mapping and outcome harvesting further as tools that they could be possibly using to change their thinking and practice.

      Gerald Ardito November 7, 2018 - 7:10am

  • Fairouz Alatabeh published a blog post Critical Review October 30, 2018 - 8:02pm
    Critical review was a hard subject for me, however, I cannot deny the fact that I have learned to read and think critically and this is the best thing of this subject. On the other hand, I really enjoyed this subject, because I got the chance to...
  • Michael Procter commented on a wiki page titled Journal For Exercise One: Two Advertisements October 30, 2018 - 2:17pm
    Welcome to the Landing group. An interesting approach to journaling which I found engaging. A bit dangerous for your readers (viewers) who tend to succumb to the lure of clickbait, but at least now I know the absolute best 10 songs of the 90s. I...
  • Fairouz Alatabeh published a blog post My experience in academic writing October 30, 2018 - 1:25pm
    I have enrolled myself in the Academic Writing Course to improve my writing skills. I have found out that I’m struggling in writing a clear paragraph or let’s say a well- organized paragraph. It’ not only this, but it’s also...
  • Colin Pinnell created a wiki page Journal For Exercise Four: SSL October 29, 2018 - 3:25pm
    Another whirlwind little exercise. It's an interesting one, because it's something we have to actually *do* in assignment five. So it's a nice little preparation. Very clever. Still, it's hard to get all of the details across in such a small space....
  • I didn't enjoy this one quite as much, but perhaps that's just because it's a very big topic that is getting squeezed into a small space. This is the sort of thing you could write a book about, and books have absolutely been written about it! My...
  • Colin Pinnell created a wiki page Journal For Exercise Two: Open vs Closed Systems October 29, 2018 - 3:22pm
    Another fun one, and it really affected my opinion on Open vs Closed systems. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5RO9gJKVzs ( www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5RO9gJKVzs )