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Jon Dron

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Teaching Crowds cover Latest book - Teaching Crowds: Learning & Social Media: buy the book or download for free

  • Jon Dron bookmarked EdTech Books November 24, 2020 - 12:58pm
    This is a great, well presented and nicely curated selection of open books on education and educational technology, ranging from classics (and compilations of chapters by classic authors) to modern guides, textbooks, and blog compilations, covering...
    Comments
    • Nice find! Thank you Prof. Dron! I have bookmarked this for future inspection, looks like it might be a good resource for when I take my educational psychology course.

      Nicolosus November 24, 2020 - 1:10pm

    • Thank you for the great openbook site. I bookmarked it for the educational resources I was looking for. 

      Michelle Dina Lee 18 hours ago

  • Thanks Rania: though I tend to reuse a lot of slides in my talks, that one was new in this presentation, so I'm glad that it resonated. Over 20 years ago I wanted to call my PhD (which involved the creation of a social bookmarking system designed...
  • Thanks Nicolosus - it's very nice to hear confirmation that it (at least sometimes) works! And yes, that process of searching is so important, and so powerful in helping us to learn to learn. It's also sometimes important, though, when the going...
  • These are the slides from my keynote at the University of Ottawa's "Scaffolding a Transformative Transition to Distance and Online Learning" symposium today. In the presentation I discussed why distance learning really is different from in-person...
    Comments
    • Thank you Prof. Jon,

      Those slides are interesting, I like the comparison between controlling and liberation patterns and I also like how you are able to use this approach within your courses.

      I learned how to learn from you, and I hope to learn how to teach as well.

      Rania Arbash November 23, 2020 - 4:29am

    • Thanks Rania: though I tend to reuse a lot of slides in my talks, that one was new in this presentation, so I'm glad that it resonated.

      Over 20 years ago I wanted to call my PhD (which involved the creation of a social bookmarking system designed to help the crowd to teach itself) 'Getting rid of teachers' but my supervisors (wisely) advised against it. In fact, it was exactly the opposite of what I was really doing, which was capitalizing on the fact that we are all teachers, even when we don't mean to be.  Though software can help to amplify and guide that process, I think it is also implicit in a lot of the human-enacted technologies of teaching: the things we normally refer to as pedagogies. A big part of much effective teaching - especially online - is not about telling people stuff or making them do stuff, but about helping to create conditions that make it easier for them all to learn from one another.

      One of the best side-effects my particular approach to doing that is that I wind up learning more from my students than they learn from me, so thank you for teaching me!

      Jon Dron November 23, 2020 - 10:37am

    • This all has bee encouraging for me to read! And yes you are correct, we all do at times need a little direction, can't overlook that fact, especially with some of us who get disctracted easily, and run down rabbit trails that, while not directly bad for our current study topic, are not exactly good for it either. I am one of those people, I also love to learn, and I want to learn EVERYTHING!

       

      Keep doing what you are doing Prof. Dron, it is encouraging to see and I just learned a little about teaching, and hope to take that with me when I start to teach others as well.

      Nicolosus November 24, 2020 - 1:06pm

  • This is a report on an interesting study which, unsurprisingly, confirms previous findings that the use of popular social media (in this case Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter) correlates very closely with negative feelings, reduced well-being, and...
    Comments
    • This insight is very interesting, and it makes sense. Definitely agree that the impacts social media has on people heavily depend on who the users are and how the users use them.

      Jenny Chun Chi Lien November 21, 2020 - 10:57pm

  • Jon Dron commented on a bookmark Course Content - London Interdisciplinary School November 11, 2020 - 9:13pm
    I'm not sure, Nicolosus. Certainly there would be no need to study for multiple degrees, and the various disciplinary perspectives would be far more integrated than in most programs/courses. There are quite a few degrees that work in the way you...
  • Jon Dron bookmarked Course Content - London Interdisciplinary School November 6, 2020 - 12:24pm
    For those in other parts of the world, some translation may be needed here in order to understand what is novel about the London Interdisciplinary School (LIS): a course in the UK is equivalent to a program in North America, and a module is...
    Comments
    • Hi Jon,

       

      If I am understanding your post and the LIS website correctly, the format being used would be an approach more like "The problom I wish to solve would be the constraints of bio-engineering in todays technical limits", and upon that build out a degree program that includes the areas of study needed to work in that specific field, whereas instead with current institutions one would say have to study for a degree in biology, and then a degree in engineering, and maybe even a third in computer science?

       

      If so, how do they award degrees? Is it a customized title based on your criteria? Or more generic?

      Nicolosus November 9, 2020 - 3:13pm

    • I'm not sure, Nicolosus. Certainly there would be no need to study for multiple degrees, and the various disciplinary perspectives would be far more integrated than in most programs/courses. There are quite a few degrees that work in the way you suggest, such as the MSc/MA by Learning Outcomes at the University of Brighton, UK, in which a goal is decided upon, then outcomes are negotiated at the start between student, institution, and employer and modules are chosen to match, but I suspect this is not quite like that.

      If I were designing this then I would most likely identify some fairly broad course (=program) outcomes, addressing things like problem-solving, synthesis, values, and application, then map the specific module (=course) outcomes to those, allowing students to adapt their goals as they learn (unlike the 'by outcomes' approach), but I don't know if that's what LIS are doing here.

      It would be interesting to find out!

      Jon Dron November 11, 2020 - 9:13pm

  • Jon Dron uploaded the file Joyful assessment: beyond high-stakes testing November 4, 2020 - 4:17pm
    Here are my slides from my presentation at the Innovate Learning Summit yesterday. It's not world-shattering stuff - just a brutal attack on proctored, unseen written exams (PUWEs, pronounced 'pooies'), followed by a description of the rationale,...
  • The authors of a recent paywalled article in MIS Quarterly here summarize their findings in another restrictive and normally paywalled site, the Washington Post. At least the latter gives some access - I was able to read it without forking out $15,...
  • Jon Dron published a blog post Asus Flip C234 Chromebook review October 27, 2020 - 6:16pm
    I’ve been thinking for some time that I need to investigate Chromebooks - at least, ever since Chrome OS added the means to run Android and Linux apps alongside Chrome web apps. I decided to get one now because I was going on a camping trip...